Abusive Relationships: Are People Getting the Help They Need?

Degradation, threats, insults, humiliation…these are just some of the occurrences in abusive relationship. Please notice that none of these descriptions have to do with being physical. A person DOES NOT have to be slapped, kicked or punched in order to be classified as a domestic violence victim.

Out of the 323,000 call that were taken by the hotline, 86% of these calls had to do with emotional and verbal abuse.

It’s also important to note that there was an 8% increase in their website activity from 2016. Thirteen percent of these cases dealt with assisting immigrates who didn’t speak English.

This report says a lot. It also makes me think of those who still aren’t getting the help they need.

For the longest, Asuma did not know she was in an abusive relationship. Her husband was insulting her, questioning her fidelity and became controlling over her identity. It took different types of events and hard choices that led to her making an ultimate decision over her life, freedom and happiness.

I’ve highlighted the signs and symptoms of Intimate Partner Violence in the past and I want you to know that those signs have not changed. If your partner:

  • Humiliates you in front of friends and family
  • Controls your finances – giving you no access
  • Forces you to have sex – especially when you don’t want to
  • Always accuses you of being unfaithful
  • Prevents you from visiting family and friends
  • Blames you for their violent outbursts

You are in an abusive relationship. From a reality standpoint, it only gets worse. It often gets completely physical and then ultimately fatal.

Once Asuma realized she was in abusive relationship, she had choices to make. Here are some steps you or someone you know can take for a safe escape:

  • Talk to someone – a counselor, Pastor, family member or friend. It is important to have some sort of social circle to get you through
  • Start writing – document everything that happens. This means when the abuse takes place. Also save all emails and texts that include abusive or threatening messages.

Shout out to DC Safe for publishing the report. To find out more about the National Domestic Hotline, go here.

Degradation, threats, insults, humiliation…these are just some of the occurrences in abusive relationship. Please notice that none of these descriptions have to do with being physical. A person DOES NOT have to be slapped, kicked or punched in order to be classified as a domestic violence victim.

Out of the 323,000 call that were taken by the hotline, 86% of these calls had to do with emotional and verbal abuse.

It’s also important to note that there was an 8% increase in their website activity from 2016. Thirteen percent of these cases dealt with assisting immigrates who didn’t speak English.

This report says a lot. It also makes me think of those who still aren’t getting the help they need.

For the longest, Asuma did not know she was in an abusive relationship. Her husband was insulting her, questioning her fidelity and became controlling over her identity. It took different types of events and hard choices that led to her making an ultimate decision over her life, freedom and happiness.

I’ve highlighted the signs and symptoms of Intimate Partner Violence in the past and I want you to know that those signs have not changed. If your partner:

Humiliates you in front of friends and family

Controls your finances – giving you no access

Forces you to have sex – especially when you don’t want to

Always accuses you of being unfaithful

Prevents you from visiting family and friends

Blames you for their violent outbursts

You are in an abusive relationship. From a reality standpoint, it only gets worse. It often gets completely physical and then ultimately fatal.

Once Asuma realized she was in abusive relationship, she had choices to make. Here are some steps you or someone you know can take for a safe escape:

If you’re not in immediate danger, make a safety plan. These resources can help.

Talk to someone – a counselor, Pastor, family member or friend. It is important to have some sort of social circle to get you through

Start writing – document everything that happens. This means when the abuse takes place. Also save all emails and texts that include abusive or threatening messages.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *